SAL/ON

A Blog of Seattle Arts & Lectures

WITS Voices: Imagination as a Seditious Act

By Aaron Counts, WITS Writer-in-Residence Each spring, schools in many districts around the country shift their focus from whatever learning is usually going on in classrooms to make room for standardized testing season. Here in Seattle, that test is the SBAC (Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium). It is a multi-subject test based on the Common Core State […]

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Friday Roundup

Twelve fun links from around the web. A rare interview: Annie Proulx on her new book. Want to learn the secrets of a book designer? Lucy Ives on Margaret the First and “archival fiction.” Missed Forrest Gander at our Neruda event? Here he is chatting about Then Come Back: The Lost Neruda on All Things […]

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“Newer Skeletons,” by Gina Rangel-Gross

Newer Skeletons (Or, A Turn of Events I Never Would Have Anticipated But Am Not Complaining About) we are starting to see each other like x-rays. starting to carefully examine each other, (exciting) & ive been examining myself too. (powerful) i love this. how else could i learn so much about bodies without seeing every […]

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Ask the Curator: How Do You Choose?

Have you ever wondered how or why a particular writer is chosen to speak at a SAL event? Rebecca Hoogs is answering curation questions on Sonder! Send questions to Alison Stagner at [email protected]res.org with “Ask the Curator” in the subject line, and we’ll pick our favorites to respond to. By Rebecca Hoogs, SAL’s Associate Director How do you choose? […]

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“Butterflies,” by Tyleah Armstrong

Butterflies Yesterday my name was dazzling diamond. Today my name is bright shiny star, soaring through the sky. Sometimes I am an empty house, a book with no pages. Strangers think my name is amusing charming rose. People don’t know I am silly princess, queen of art, dazzling mermaid, rough and tough. My real name […]

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On Claudia Rankine and Citizen

By Gabrielle Bates “The route is often associative.” —Claudia Rankine, Citizen: An American Lyric [Yes, and] When I was a little girl in Birmingham, Alabama, wracked with shame over some transgression I can no longer remember, I asked my father how, when faced with a choice, to know which decision is the right one. He […]

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“Henri Rousseau,” by Nadia Luke

Henri Rousseau On the forest floor, the trees growing with bananas and peaches. A flower in the distance is as pink as a sunset flying away and the light blue and gray sky is like a fan trying to blow its way out of trouble. I’m telling you there is more to this jungle than […]

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WITS Voices: All the Warm Night, Sleep in Moonlight

By Ann Teplick, WITS Writer-in-Residence   Sleep in a field of salmon peonies. A rooftop with saxophone jazz. A sand dune with peacocks. All the warm night, sleep by the creek with its burble, the sheep with its fleece of charcoal, the sister who whispers “Let’s launch the canoe.” All the warm night. As a […]

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Required Reading: Claudia Rankine

As part of our Required Reading series, we share a list of three essential works for each of SAL’s featured writers. Up this time: groundbreaking poet, essayist, and playwright Claudia Rankine.  Citizen: An American Lyric (2014) In 1970, Harvard professor Chester Pierce came up the term “micro-aggression” to describe the unconscious dismissals and insults non-black Americans inflict on black people. In […]

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