Carol Anderson: Online

Carol Anderson: Online

Sunday, June 21, 2020 7:30 pm

06/21/2020 7:30 pm 06/21/2020 America/Los_Angeles Carol Anderson: Online https://lectures.org/event/carol-anderson/ lectures.org

At lectures.org

Literary Arts Icon

Literary Arts

This event will be streamed online—click the “Learn More” button to see details. Carol Anderson’s viral op-ed for the Washington Post explored the concept of “white rage” after Ferguson, Missouri erupted in 2014. Her subsequent book, White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide, won the 2016 National Book Critics Circle Award for Criticism. Her latest book, One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression is Destroying Our Democracy (2018), is an urgent history of voter suppression in America.

About the online format: We are happy to say that we will be able to stream Carol Anderson’s event online. We hope that offering Anderson’s event in a new format will enable you to hear her compelling message from the safety of your home. Anderson’s lecture will only be available to ticket holders, streamed digitally on lectures.org, at the original date and time of her event. The event will also be available online for a week afterwards, so you can hit the “pause” button and return to it at your leisure. Closer to the event, we will send ticket holders a password they will use to access her event with further instructions.

Carol Anderson is one of the leading scholars on black American history. “White rage recurs in American history,” Anderson writes in White Rage. “It exploded after the Civil War, erupted again to undermine the Supreme Court’s Brown v. Board of Education decision and took on its latest incarnation with Barack Obama’s ascent to the White House. For every action of African American advancement, there’s a reaction, a backlash.”

Anderson’s work explores the insidious policies that have systematically impeded black progress in America, from 1865 to our combustible present. With One Person, No Vote, she chronicles the rollbacks to African American participation in the vote since the 2013 Supreme Court decision that demolished the Voting Rights Act of 1965. This decision, called the Shelby ruling, effectively allows districts with a demonstrated history of racial discrimination to change voting requirements without approval from the Department of Justice.

Anderson earned both her graduate and master’s degree in political science, international relations, and history from Miami University. She earned a PhD in history from Ohio State University in 1995. Her career as a professor started at the University of Missouri-Columbia, where she was awarded the William T. Kemper Fellowship for Excellence in Teaching. She published her first book, Eyes Off the Prize: The United Nations and the African American Struggle for Human Rights, 1944-1955, in 2003. The book received both the Gustavus Myers Outstanding Book Award and the Myrna F. Bernath Book Award.

In 2005, Anderson was awarded a fellowship at Harvard University, where she worked on her next book, Bourgeois Radicals: The NAACP and the Struggle for Colonial Liberation, 1941-1960 (2015). The following year, White Rage was released and named a notable book of the year by the New York Times, the Washington Post, and the Chicago Review of Books. The book was chosen as a New York Times Editor’s Choice in July of 2016, and Anderson was named number 11 on the Politico 50 List that same year.

Anderson is currently the Charles Howard Candler Professor of African American Studies at Emory University. Her writing has been featured in The Atlantic, the Guardian, and Huffington Post.

Brian J. Carter is the Executive Director of 4Culture, where he serves as chief executive officer, creating and maintaining a clear vision for this cultural funding organization. He oversees development and implementation of all services, programs, and projects that support and advance the organization’s vision, mission, and values. Brian acts as the primary liaison to elected officials, community partners, constituents, and stakeholders, building effective relationships that promote, support, and nurture a culturally healthy King County.

Prior to this position, Brian served as Director of Interpretation at the Burke Museum of Natural History & Culture, in Seattle, WA; Museum Director at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon; and was a founding staff member of the Northwest African American Museum in Seattle, where he served as Deputy Director/Head Curator.

Carter graduated with high honors from Stanford University, where he majored in American history with a minor in African and African American studies. He is also a graduate of the University of Washington Master of Arts in Museology. He is the Immediate Past President of the Board of the Association of African American Museums, a member of the American Alliance of Museum’s Diversity, Equity, Accessibility, and Inclusion Task Force, and serves on the Advisory Board of the University of Washington’s Museum Studies Certificate Program.

Event Details

lectures.org

Know Before You Go

How do I access the online event?

Two days before Carol Anderson’s online event, on Friday, June 19, we will email all ticket holders the special link and passcode to access her talk. We will also send another email the day of her talk for later ticket buyers, containing the same information. If you have opted out of receiving SAL emails, you will miss this important information—please email us at boxoffice@lectures.org and we will assist you.

Have a question for the speaker?

Ticket holders, watch for an email that will give you information on how to send in your Q&A questions.

Books

If you don’t already own Carol Anderson’s books, we encourage you to purchase them online at Island Books, our bookstore partner for this event.