Colum McCann

Brendan Bourke

Colum McCann

Past Event: Thursday, May 24, 2012

At Benaroya Hall — S. Mark Taper Foundation Auditorium

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Literary Arts

Born and raised in Dublin, Ireland, Colum McCann, at 21, paid a “brief” visit to Cape Cod to write a “great Irish-American novel.” Writer’s block led to a bicycle trip across the U.S. lasting a year and a half. “It was an extraordinary journey,” McCann says. “It taught me the value of stories and story-tellers.”

In 1988, McCann returned to the United States, where he worked as a wilderness guide at a juvenile detention center before attending the University of Texas.

In 1994, McCann moved to New York. “I feel inordinately blessed,” McCann says. “I live here in the city, but I can hear the voice of Ireland in almost everything. I suppose if I had to label myself I’d like to be seen as an international writer.” McCann’s work covers international territory: the troubles in Northern Ireland (Everything in This Country Must), the Roma culture in Europe (Zoli), the ambitions of an artist in Soviet Russia (Dancer). His latest novel, Let the Great World Spin, has been heralded as “the first great 9/11 novel” by Esquire Magazine. “I love the fact that our stories can cross all sorts of borders and boundaries,” says McCann…I don’t know of a greater privilege than being allowed to tell a story, or to listen to a story. They’re the only thing we have that can trump life itself.” To one New York Times reviewer, McCann’s approach most closely resembles that of “a great pitcher in his prime…. McCann is constantly changing speeds, adopting different voices, tones and narrative styles as he shifts between story lines.”

McCann’s talk on May 24 is entitled “Get Lost! Losing & Finding Yourself in the Art of the Story.”

Q&A with Colum McCann

What is your idea of happiness?

My dead grandfather touching me on the shoulder and telling me that it’s time for us to go out for a drink.

With which historical figure do you most identify? I have recently spent a lot of time trying to write myself into the mind of Frederick Douglass, the American slave and abolitionist, who was in Ireland in 1845. I have enormous admiration for him and his quest for justice. I am not sure I can identify with him, but I would like to think that I understand him. I triumph him.      What do you consider the most overrated virtue? Chastity of course. (If anybody ever still thinks of it as a virtue). Temperance. Prudence. I am fond of the Thoreau quote: “We should go forth on the shortest journey, in the spirit of undying adventure, never to return …”     What do you regard as the lowest depth of misery? Being around those people who believe they’ve never met anyone more interesting than themselves.  What is your most marked characteristic? An ability to believe in optimism in the face of all other available evidence.  Who are your favorite writers? Oh, an impossible impossible question. I like those writers who break my heart.

Read more about McCann on his official website.

Event Details

Benaroya Hall — S. Mark Taper Foundation Auditorium

200 University Street
Seattle, WA 98101

View directions.

Transportation & Parking

This event will be held in the S. Mark Taper Foundation Auditorium, the largest event space at Benaroya Hall. 

Benaroya Hall is located at 200 University Street, directly across Second Avenue from the Seattle Art Museum. The public entrance to Benaroya Hall is along Third Avenue.

  • From Southbound I-5
    Take the Union Street exit (#165B). Continue onto Union Street and proceed approximately five blocks to Second Avenue. Turn left onto Second Avenue. The Benaroya Hall parking garage will be on your immediate left. The garage entrance is on Second Avenue, just south of Union Street.
  • From Northbound I-5
    Exit left onto Seneca Street (exit #165). Proceed two blocks and turn right onto Fourth Avenue. Continue two blocks. Turn left onto Union Street. Continue two blocks. Turn left onto Second Avenue. The Benaroya Hall parking garage will be on your immediate left. The garage entrance is on Second Avenue, just south of Union Street.
  • From Northbound Highway 99 (Aurora Avenue)
    Take the Seneca Street exit and move into the left lane. Turn left onto First Avenue and proceed one block. Take the next right (at the Hammering Man sculpture) onto University Street. Continue up the hill two blocks to Third Avenue. Turn left onto Third Avenue. Continue to the next block and turn left onto Union Street. Make the next left onto Second Avenue. The Benaroya Hall parking garage will be on your immediate left. The garage entrance is on Second Avenue, just south of Union Street.
  • From Southbound Highway 99 (Aurora Avenue)
    Take the Denny Way/Downtown exit. Keep right and cross over Denny Way onto Wall Street. Proceed approximately five blocks and turn left onto Second Avenue. Continue south on Second Avenue approximately eight blocks. The Benaroya Hall parking garage will be on your left. The garage entrance is on Second Avenue, just south of Union Street.

By Bus
Benaroya Hall is served by numerous bus routes. Digital reader boards along Third Avenue display real-time bus arrival information. For details and trip planning tools, call Metro Rider Information at 206.553.3000 (voice) or 206.684.1739 (TDD), or visit Metro online. The Downtown Seattle Transit Tunnel, served by bus and light rail, has a stop just below the Hall (University Street Station).

Parking
The 430-car underground garage at Benaroya Hall provides direct access from the enclosed parking area into the Hall via elevators leading to The Boeing Company Gallery. Enter the garage on Second Avenue, just south of Union Street. Maximum vehicle height is 6’8″. Blink charging stations are available for electric vehicles. The event rate is $16.

Parking is also available at:

  • The Cobb Building (enter on University Street between Third and Fourth avenues).
  • The Russell Investments Center (enter on Union Street between First and Second avenues).
  • There are many other garages within a one-block radius of Benaroya Hall, along with numerous on-street parking options.

Accessibility

SAL is for everyone. We want all audience members to be able to experience our lectures and readings regardless of accessibility concerns. Accessibility services at our venues are provided at no cost to ticket holders. If you find you need to sit closer to the stage to accommodate your needs but find the cost of a Patron ticket prohibitive, then please contact us—we will seat you where you need to be, regardless of cost.

Open Captioning occurs at every event that takes place at Benaroya Hall. It is also always available upon request for all events in our other halls, with a two-week minimum notice. To make a request for Open Captioning services, please contact us at boxoffice@lectures.org or 206.621.2230×10.

Assisted Listening Devices, including Hearing Loop Assisted Listening Systems, are available at all of our venues, with the exception of Broadway Performance Hall. If you would like more information, please contact us at boxoffice@lectures.org or 206.621.2230×10.

ASL-Interpretated Events are always available upon request, with a two-week minimum notice. To make a request for ASL interpretation, please contact us at boxoffice@lectures.org or 206.621.2230×10.

Wheelchair Accessible Ticketing is available in all sections at our venues, and and our venues are fully accessible to ticket holders with physical mobility concerns. If you would like more information, please contact us at boxoffice@lectures.org or 206.621.2230×10.

For any further questions or requests, or to offer Seattle Arts & Lectures feedback on how we can be more accessible and inclusive, please reach out to our Patron Services Manager at boxoffice@lectures.org or 206.621.2230×10.